Decrypting ASP.NET 4.5


The title mentions ASP.NET 4.5.x, but the encryption algorithm is exactly the same in ASP.NET 4.6.x. It won’t work however in earlier versions of ASP.NET.

Some time ago I published a post entitled “Decrypting ASP.NET identity cookies”. In that post we wrote a Python script to decrypt ASP.NET Identity cookies. You could have also learnt how the derived keys, used to encrypt those cookies, are calculated. If you are interested in details, please have a look at that article. But to summarize, the following steps are performed by ASP.NET:

  1. Extract the encryption and the validation key from the web.config file
  2. Calculate the derived keys using the SP800-108 specification, with the context and the label taken from an adequate Purpose class instance
  3. Validate and decrypt the cipher

The above procedure applies not only to the cookies decryption, but also to many other cryptographic operations, such as ViewState encryption, Forms Authentication, Anti-Forgery tokens creation etc. However, there is still a missing gap in the presented flow. What if the encryption and the validation keys are not explicitly set in the web.config file? Today, we will answer this question.

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Decrypting ASP.NET 4.5

Decrypting ASP.NET Identity cookies


I decided recently I need to learn Python. It’s a great scripting language, often used in forensics, diagnostics and debugging tools. There is even a plugin for windbg that allows you to script this debugger in Python language, but it’s a subject for another post. Moving back to learning Python – as an exercise I wrote a simple tool to decrypt ASP.NET Identity cookies and ASP.NET Anti-Forgery tokens. You may find it useful in situations when you need to diagnose why one of your users can’t sign in into your applications or is not authorize to access one of its parts. It does not perform validation but only decrypts the content using 256-bit AES (let me know in comments if you need some other decryption algorithm to be implemented). Adding validation logic shouldn’t be a big deal and the nist library (which I used for cryptographic operations) provides all the necessary functions.

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Decrypting ASP.NET Identity cookies

Common authentication/authorization between .NET4.0 and .NET4.5 web applications


ASP.NET Identity is a big step forward and we should profit from its features, such as: two-step authentication, support for OpenId providers, stronger password hashing and claims usage. One of its requirements is .NET4.5 which might be a blocker if you have in your farm legacy Windows 2003 R2 servers still hosting some of your MVC4 (.NET4.0) applications. In this post I would like to show you how you may implement common authentication and authorization mechanisms between them and your new ASP.NET MVC5 (and .NET4.5) applications deployed on newer servers. I assume that your apps have a common domain and thus are able to share cookies.

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Common authentication/authorization between .NET4.0 and .NET4.5 web applications

ASP.NET Anti-Forgery Tokens internals


Anti-Forgery Tokens were introduced in ASP.NET in order to prevent Cross-Site Request Forgeries. There are many sites which describe how to use and configure those tokens in your application. But in this post I’m going to show you what exactly those tokens contain, where they are generated and how to customize them.

Let’s start our journey from a sample Razor HTTP form:

...
@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
    @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Name)<br />
    @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.FullName)<br />
    <br />
    <input type="submit" value="Test" />
}
...

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ASP.NET Anti-Forgery Tokens internals

NullReferenceException and MachineKey.Decode


In my recent project I had to sign a http cookie in order to disallow any unauthorized changes to its content. I didn’t want to reinvent the wheel but use something already implemented in ASP.NET – for instance mechanism that is used to sign ViewState content. After some research I found promising methods: System.Web.Security.MachineKey.Encode/Decode (I’m using .NET4, in 4.5 these method are obsolete and new methods: Protect/Unprotect were introduced to replace them). Let’s first look at an example how to use those methods. The below code snippet retrieves content of a signed cookie or prints information that the cookie was tampered:

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NullReferenceException and MachineKey.Decode

ASP.NET MVC bundles internals


The idea of minimizing and combining multiple script and style files into one file has been popular among web developers for quite some time. With the 4th version of ASP.NET MVC Microsoft introduced a mechanism (called bundles) that allow .NET developers to automate and control this process. Although bundles are quite easy to configure and use they might sometimes do not behave as expected. In this post I’m going to acquaint you with bundles internals and present you ways to troubleshoot problems they may generate.

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ASP.NET MVC bundles internals

The truth about app_offline.htm


In this short post I would like to present you am interesting fact about app_offline.htm. Let’s start with a small puzzle. Imagine you have 2 files in your IIS application folder: web.config and app_offline.htm. Web.config contains following lines:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<configuration>
</configuration

and app_offline.htm:

We'll be back in a moment.

Notice that in the web.config file the configuration tag is not closed. Now the question is: what will you see if you try to access your application from the browser?

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The truth about app_offline.htm