How to securely sign .NET assemblies


TestLib, Version=1.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=769a8f10a7f072b4

If the above line means anything to you, you are probably a .NET developer. You also probably know that the hex string at the end represents a public key token, which is a sign that the assembly has a strong name signature. But do you know how this token is calculated? Or do you know the structure of the strong name signature? In this post, I will go into details how strong naming works and what are its shortcomings. We will also have a look at certificate-based signatures and, in the end, we will examine the assembly verification process.

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How to securely sign .NET assemblies

Decrypting ASP.NET 4.5


The title mentions ASP.NET 4.5.x, but the encryption algorithm is exactly the same in ASP.NET 4.6.x. It won’t work however in earlier versions of ASP.NET.

Some time ago I published a post entitled “Decrypting ASP.NET identity cookies”. In that post we wrote a Python script to decrypt ASP.NET Identity cookies. You could have also learnt how the derived keys, used to encrypt those cookies, are calculated. If you are interested in details, please have a look at that article. But to summarize, the following steps are performed by ASP.NET:

  1. Extract the encryption and the validation key from the web.config file
  2. Calculate the derived keys using the SP800-108 specification, with the context and the label taken from an adequate Purpose class instance
  3. Validate and decrypt the cipher

The above procedure applies not only to the cookies decryption, but also to many other cryptographic operations, such as ViewState encryption, Forms Authentication, Anti-Forgery tokens creation etc. However, there is still a missing gap in the presented flow. What if the encryption and the validation keys are not explicitly set in the web.config file? Today, we will answer this question.

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Decrypting ASP.NET 4.5

Decrypting ASP.NET Identity cookies


I decided recently I need to learn Python. It’s a great scripting language, often used in forensics, diagnostics and debugging tools. There is even a plugin for windbg that allows you to script this debugger in Python language, but it’s a subject for another post. Moving back to learning Python – as an exercise I wrote a simple tool to decrypt ASP.NET Identity cookies and ASP.NET Anti-Forgery tokens. You may find it useful in situations when you need to diagnose why one of your users can’t sign in into your applications or is not authorize to access one of its parts. It does not perform validation but only decrypts the content using 256-bit AES (let me know in comments if you need some other decryption algorithm to be implemented). Adding validation logic shouldn’t be a big deal and the nist library (which I used for cryptographic operations) provides all the necessary functions.

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Decrypting ASP.NET Identity cookies

ASP.NET Anti-Forgery Tokens internals


Anti-Forgery Tokens were introduced in ASP.NET in order to prevent Cross-Site Request Forgeries. There are many sites which describe how to use and configure those tokens in your application. But in this post I’m going to show you what exactly those tokens contain, where they are generated and how to customize them.

Let’s start our journey from a sample Razor HTTP form:

...
@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
    @Html.AntiForgeryToken()
    @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.Name)<br />
    @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.FullName)<br />
    <br />
    <input type="submit" value="Test" />
}
...

Continue reading “ASP.NET Anti-Forgery Tokens internals”

ASP.NET Anti-Forgery Tokens internals